Black talk

“Time For An Awakening” with Bro.Elliott 8-4-19 guest Timia Bethea and students from Univ. Texas at Austin

“Time For An Awakening” for Sunday 8/04/2019 at 7:00 PM (EST) our guests was International Business senior, Ms.Timia Bethea and the student team from the University of Texas at Austin. Ms. Bethea  is part of a student team that included Ms. Christina Cho, Ms.Vida Nwadiei and Ms.Rebecca Chen who is doing research on Colorism and specifically the topic of skin bleaching in Africa, and their research in particular in  Ghana. We discussed some of their assessments with students at the University of Ghana, and interviews with men and women of the Chorkor, on this and related topics.

“Time for an Awakening” with Bro.Elliottt , Sunday 7-28-19 Open Forum “Black Lawmakers and the Condition of our Communities”

“Time For An Awakening” for Sunday 7/28/2019 at 7:00 PM EST our guest was the listeners in Open Forum conversation. On the heels of the racist statement by Trump let’s ask the critical question, do “Black Elected Officials hold any responsibility for the condition of our communities in Baltimore and other Cities” was one of the topics discussed.

“Time For An Awakening” with Bro.Elliott, Friday 7-19-19 guest Carlton Sanders

“Time For An Awakening” for Sunday 7/19/2019 at 7:00 PM our guest was African American Farmer, Activist, Carlton Sanders. In part II of this discussion Mr. Sanders informed the listeners about his struggle, and also other Black Poultry Farmers in the Black Belt. And in Mississippi, how one of the nations top Poultry Processors are trying to drive Black Farmers out of business, which will result in the lost of land.

“Time for an Awakening”with Bro.Elliott 7-14-19 guest Dr. Kevin Cokley

“Time For An Awakening” for Sunday 7/14/2019 at 7:00 PM (EST) 6:00 PM (CST) our guest was  Psychologist,  Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research, Dr. Kevin Cokley. We discussed his article and related topics centering around Black people in the diaspora reconnecting with the Continent.

https://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/commentary/2019/06/23/juneteenth-time-african-  americans-connect-africa     

“Time for an Awakening” with Bro.Elliott, Friday 7/05/19 guest Dr. William Rogers part II

“Time For An Awakening” for Friday 7/05/2019 at 8:00 PM (EST) 7:00 PM (CST) our guest was Educator, host of Black Reality Think Tank, Dr. William Rogers.  This was part II of our discussion, which  included Dr. Rogers, and  centered around the period of Reconstruction 1865-77 from an African Centered Perspective. We discussed some of the things our ancestors attempted to do Politically, Educationally, Economically, and see how that relates to our struggle moving forward.

“Time for an Awakening” with Bro.Elliott, 6-30-19 guest Dr. William Rogers

“Time For An Awakening” for Sunday 6/30/2019 at 7:00 PM (EST) 6:00 PM (CST) our guest was Educator, host of Black Reality Think Tank, Dr. William Rogers. Our discussion centered around the period of Reconstruction 1865-77 from an African Centered Perspective. We discussed some of the things our ancestors attempted to do Politically, Educationally, Economically, and see how that relates to our struggle moving forward.

The Storied History of the Black Press: ‘The Pillars of Black America’s Struggle for Justice’

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent, @StacyBrownMedia

Since the founding of the Black Press 192 years ago, African American-owned newspapers have served their communities in ways that no other publications have.

Historically, these publications have operated on “shoe-string” budgets, are usually understaffed, and also face other severe limitations. Yet, the Black Press always has maintained its mission as the voice of Black America.

That tradition has held true through many transitions and has continued during the 79-year history of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA). The NNPA is the trade organization representing America’s Black-owned newspapers and media companies. The organization’s members serve millions of readers that rely on the Black Press to provide content not regularly found in other media.

For many, the Black Press is just as essential to the culture of the community as the Black church.

“It is undeniable that the Black church and the Black Press have been, and continue to be, the foundational pillars of Black America’s long struggle for freedom, justice, equality and empowerment,” said NNPA President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr.

“We know first-hand the power of the pen and we remain committed to helping to ensure and to mentor the next generation of freedom-fighting publishers, editors and journalists,” Chavis said.

On March 16, 1827, The Rev. Samuel Cornish and John Russwurm made history by publishing “Freedom’s Journal,” the nation’s first Black newspaper.

NNPA Chairman Dorothy R. Leavell, who publishes the Chicago and Gary Crusader newspapers, has often described “Freedom’s Journal” as courageous and she regularly cites the newspaper’s motto as one that remains a focus of the Black Press today.

“We wish to tell our own story,” Leavell said, quoting Russwurm and Cornish’s mission that, “for too long others have spoken for us, but we wish to tell our own story.”

Circulated in 11 states and in Europe, Canada and Haiti, “Freedom’s Journal” provided international, national and local details pertinent to the Black community. They denounced slavery and lynching and, among the many features that endeared the newspaper to its readers, were African American community-based marriage, birth and death announcements.

Soon, other Black-owned papers like the Savannah Tribune, The Afro-American in Baltimore, the Indianapolis Recorder, and The Philadelphia Tribune began publishing.

Those newspapers and others, like the Pittsburgh Courier, the New Journal and Guide in Virginia, and The Kansas City Call, have maintained the tradition and continue to deliver news and insights today.

The NNPA honors the history and legacy of the Black Press via The Black Press Archives and Gallery of Distinguished Publishers at Howard University.

Each year during Black Press Week in Washington, DC, a NNPA member is posthumously enshrined in the Archives and Gallery.

“It’s so important we remember our past and remember those whose shoulders we stand upon,” Chavis said.

As community-focused publishers, the news that appears in NNPA’s member publications affects the day-to-day lives of their readership. For example, in Dallas, Texas, where voters recently elected a new mayor, U.S. congressman and Dallas County District Attorney.

For many in Dallas’ African American community, these much-needed changes were underscored through the resilient coverage of the city’s Black-owned North Dallas Gazette, which for decades has provided some of the most in-depth coverage of local elections for a publication of its size.

“We regularly inform our readers on the bills and positions offered by our new congressman and last year, we featured several stories on criminal justice and bail reform,” said the paper’s publisher Thurman Jones.

Since its first issue nearly 50 years ago, the South Florida-based Westside Gazette has maintained the high level of professional, insightful and reader-sensitive reporting that has gained the trust and respect of South Florida’s African American community.

Two of its signature events – “Sweet Potato Pie, Politics and Ice Cream,” and “The White Hat Gala,” – have proven a hit throughout the Sunshine State.

“The ‘Sweet Potato Pie, Politics and Ice Cream’ event is where our politicians come out and actually serve the audience sweet potato pie and ice cream,” said Westside Gazette publisher, Bobby Henry.

“It’s really unique and it gives an opportunity for an intimate formal discussion with those who are vying for political position,” he said.

The “White Hat Gala,” counts as a fundraiser for Sickle Cell Disease.

The Toledo Journal Newspaper in Toledo, Ohio, has been publishing since 1975 and, like the content found throughout its pages, its slogan is an attention-grabber: “Everybody is Somebody in The Toledo Journal.”

“This has made a difference in making our Black community feel important,” said the newspaper’s publisher, Sandra S. Stewart.

“Over the years, we have had an impact in the areas of business, political, social, recreational, religious, and sports, in our community. So, our readers believe in us and know we are fair to our community,” she said.

The impact of the legacy, history and challenges met and overcome by members of the Black Press has not been lost on or squandered by today’s NNPA members. While the Black Press has expanded to include cities and communities throughout the country, including New York, Washington, South Carolina, New Orleans, St. Louis, Chicago, Texas, and California, member publishers have continued to live up to the civil rights mantra of “Soldiers without Swords.”

READ MORES AT: https://www.afro.com/the-storied-history-of-the-black-press-the-pillars-of-black-americas-struggle-for-justice/

“Time For An Awakening” for Sunday 6/09/2019 at 7:00 PM, guests was Activists, N.Y. Black Radio host, Keisha Forrester

Our guest was Sister Keisha, of the Straight Black Talk program out of N.Y. She highlighted her speaking in Philadelphia on the topic “One Hundred Years of Lynching Continued”, along with other hot topics that effect our community.

“Time For An Awakening” with Bro. Elliott, Sunday 6/02/2019 at 7:00 PM guests was Activist, Organizer, Bro. Brandon of the Ujima Peoples Progress Party.

We received an update from Bro. Brandon, of the initiatives currently in progress after the Statewide Convention of the Ujima Peoples Progress Party, that was held on May 11th 2019, and the need of our people to develop viable alternatives to the current political structure.

“Time for an Awakening” with Bro. Elliott 5-19-19 guests are Activists Stanley Crawford, Kofi Asante, Black Male Community Council of Philadelphia

“Time For An Awakening” for Sunday 5/19/2019 at 7:00 PM (EST) 6:00 PM (CST) our guests was Philadelphia Activists, Organizers, Stanley Crawford and Kofi Asante. In this environment of violent attacks in and on the Black from within and without, we discuss with our guests their efforts centering around the Philadelphia Black Male Community Council, and initiative to have Black Men involved in policing and maintaining our own communities.

Scroll to top