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“Proof of Consciousness” (P.O.C.) the Host of REVIVE!!! 12/20/2017

Today’s REVIVE show topic is entitled:

“Wednesday Edition”

#REVIVE #WeeklyThrill #SpecialGuest 

#CurrentEvents #TrendingTopics 

It would be amazing to hear your perspective. So please call in we want to hear what you guys out there have to say always. Once again this show is for the people. We here at REVIVE thrive off of communication. So call us at (215)490-9832. This episode of REVIVE will be an open forum so all perspectives can be heard through great conversation.

This episode on REVIVE is entitled “Wednesday Edition” on REVIVE RADIO! Call in to REVIVE at 215-490-9832, you never know what may happen!

GUEST:

Morgan Davis: Morgan Davis is a graduate of Howard University, where she received her BFA in Fashion Design. She is currently pursuing her MBA at the University of Maryland University College. When she’s not running Distinctly Creative, she also works at the University of Maryland doing marketing for some of their entrepreneurship programs, and provides freelance graphic design, photography, videography and fashion design services for local brands.

Distinctly Creative is committed to a vision of promoting and advocating for black creatives and entrepreneurs, and being the go-to platform for those looking to broaden their skill sets and reach, network with other like-minded individuals, and connect their brand/business with the overall community. Distinctly Creative was founded in the Winter of 2015, and is composed of the DMV Black Creatives Directory, events (social & professional), the Black Creatives Matter apparel line, the #blackcreativemagic contest, and #theblackcreativemagic web series.
One of the major focuses of Distinctly Creative is to support and advocate for black creatives and black-owned creative brands/businesses because #blackcreativesmatter.
 

DestinyTheMuse: Destiny is a motivational speaker and a poet who prides herself on inspiring those around her. Her relationship with God is the force that drives her in everything she does. Her very first spoken word performance was featured on All Def poetry YouTube channel and received over 89,000 views and counting. Destiny has a heavy heart for women who are struggling with insecurity and loving themselves as it is a personal uphill battle she continues to fight everyday. Destiny is very active in her community and makes it a point to give back whenever she can. You can find her on the stage or engaged in a conversation with a complete stranger. Everywhere she goes she makes it a point to carry love with her.

DestinyTheMuse is a brand that encourages self reflection and self awareness. The goal is to encourage individuals to ask themselves the tough questions with the hope that they will in return step into the best version of themselves. Free of judgement and free of exceptions. Authenticity at all levels is the ultimate goal of DestinyTheMuse.

YOU CAN CATCH REVIVE EVERY SUNDAY 11 AM-1 PM & EVERY WEDNESDAY 8 PM-10 PM!!!  

It would be amazing to hear your perspective. So please call in we want to hear what you guys the listening audience out there have to say always. Once again this show is for the people. We here at REVIVE thrive off of communication. So call us at (215)490-9832  & follow on Twitter, IG & Facebook @REVIVE_POC 

 WE NEED YOU ALL TO BE APART OF THE CONVERSATION!!

Time for an Awakening with Bro. Elliott Sunday Edition 12/17/17 guest Prof. Carl Tone Jones

“Time for an Awakening” for Sunday 12/17/2017 at 7:00 PM (EST) 6:00 PM (CST) guests will be YOU in Open Forum conversation with the listeners on this weeks hot topics, or whatever is on your mind. But first, a visit from Bro. OBA, Bro. Heru, and Bro. Farugh of the Afrakan Independence Day Organizing Committee. Also Prof. Carl T. Jones exec. producer of “The Independence Day Project” documentary film talked about the film.

 

Debating Black Freedom

 

Throughout US history, African Americans have pushed the limits — and beyond — of what America claims to be. The questions posed by both intellectuals and everyday African Americans during the Reconstruction, New Deal, and Civil Rights eras have all left lasting effects on the country. So too with the US left: time and again, black radicals have pressed for an expanded scope of political and economic freedoms, for Americans at home and for people abroad.

Christopher Tinson’s important new book, Radical Intellect: Liberator Magazine and Black Activism in the 1960s, spotlights one critical organ of the African-American left during the tumultuous Civil Rights and Black Power eras. At a time when intellectual currents were in flux, inchoate and colliding, Liberator simultaneously served as an important forum for debate and a reminder of the diversity of the African-American left. The magazine, Tinson writes, “stood at the crossroads of knowledge production and insurrection,” providing activists and intellectuals a place where they could hash out their ideas and make appeals to others. Intellectually, it proved to be an important waypoint between the resurgent black nationalism seen in places like Harlem in the early 1960s and the burgeoning Black Power movement of the late 1960s.

Liberator magazine was founded in 1961 by several radical African Americans living in New York City. It operated at the nexus of a rising black nationalism, the nascent New Left, the remains of the Old Left, and the more militant elements of the Civil Rights Movement. The founders of the publication embodied this ideological and temporal mix. Pete Beveridge was a former member of the Communist Party, while Richard Gibson spent his early career reporting on the anticolonial struggle in Africa. (Editor in chief Dan Watts was the relative outlier, with a background as an architect.)

Two tenets anchored the magazine’s politics: a Pan-Africanism “that appreciated some sense of the political and cultural unity of African descendants, while also fully embracing local exigencies of considerable difference”; and a skepticism “of liberalism and gradualist approaches to social change.”

Founded to provide news and analysis about decolonization from a more radical perspective than mainstream publications, Liberator was an unabashed partisan of anticolonial struggles. The magazine deplored the depredations of colonial regimes and championed the movements seeking to overthrow them. Emerging as it did in the early 1960s, when elements of the US left were concerned the Cold War superpowers would pull newly independent Third World nations into their spheres of influence, the magazine became an important organ for those opposing oppression in the Global South.

At home, the magazine’s brand of radicalism led it to look askance at more mainstream left figures. In their eyes, Martin Luther King Jr and other civil rights leaders were too cozy with liberal politicians, too limited in their tactics and demands. More laudable were figures like Malcolm X and radical organizations such as the Revolutionary Action Movement, or RAM.

The publication’s analysis of the 1963 March on Washington reflected these ambiguities. While they agreed with the economic aims of the demonstration — remember, it was a march for “jobs and freedom” — many of Liberator’s writers and editors expressed skepticism about the utility of “relying on such a dramatization to generate the full range of black political and economic desires.”

The question of what African Americans could achieve in the US — not just through civil rights victories but through wholesale changes in the American system — kept the Liberator’s pages alive with debate throughout the 1960s. New Left collided with Old Left, old-school Pan-Africanism came into play with the new black nationalism. The journal, Tinson writes, “demonstrate(d) the sheer amount of energy devoted to black radical futures, and yet it also reveals how deeply contested definitions and practices of radicalism were in this period.”

One noted participant in these intellectual battles was Harold Cruse. In 1963 and 1964, Liberator published a series of essays by the University of Michigan scholar titled “Rebellion or Revolution?” Cruse argued that Africans Americans needed to fight for thoroughgoing cultural change, to “move the struggle from a civil rights-based rebellion to a full-fledged revolution.” He explicitly linked the US civil rights struggle to Third World revolutions, where people waging battles for independence from European rule were fighting for control of not just political and economic but also cultural institutions.

Later that decade, in his 1967 magnum opus Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, Cruse would issue stinging rebukes of numerous black radicals and publications, including Liberator. But he was better off for having the magazine as a clearinghouse for his early, wide-ranging essays on black nationalism and Marxism.

Larry Neal also benefited from having Liberator as a playground for his ideas on black aesthetics, which would serve as key frameworks for the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s and 1970s. Like Cruse and many others at Liberator, Neal argued that black people had to take ownership of the arts and culture within their community, and use them to benefit their fellow African Americans.

At the same time, he was critical of stalwarts on the black left like Bayard Rustin, who was close to labor liberals. In a 1965 Liberator essay, Neal invoked Malcolm X to push against Rustin, arguing that African Americans had to make their struggle part of a larger, international movement for human rights. Neal’s case for a “black spiritual and intellectual awakening” was, again, a window into the debates among African Americans over the future of the black freedom struggle in America.

Tinson also shows how Liberator served as an intellectual home for radical African-American women. Liberator ran articles about figures like playwright Loraine Hansberry and activist Gloria Richardson, and published some of the earliest works of Toni Cade Bambara, future editor of the groundbreaking anthology The Black Woman. The magazine gave women a chance to hone their literary and debating skills before assuming leadership roles in the Black Power and feminist movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Liberator operated during a golden age for African-American radical publications. Freedomways, cofounded by W. E. B. Du Bois, launched in 1961, the same year as Liberator. By the end of the decade, a revitalized Negro Digest — printed under the Johnson Publication Company banner (the same publisher of Ebony and Jet magazines) — would establish itself as a redoubt of black intellectual thought (and change its name to Black World to reflect its more radical stance on social issues). Black Scholar set up shop in 1969, and helped catalyze the first wave of black studies scholarship in the early 1970s.

But money was always a problem for publications like Liberator. In 1971, lacking a steady stream of income — and beset by personality clashes — the magazine closed its pages. Others on the black left would follow. Black World stopped printing in 1976. Freedomways made it through the decade, but closed in 1985. The Institute of the Black World, a black-run think tank that was another important institution for thinking through the black radical tradition was finished by the early 1980s.

Liberator’s lifespan was relatively short, and its subscription base was relatively small. Yet it was read by radicals across the United States — and quite a few abroad — who wanted to make sense of the world they lived in. Its links to groups well outside its New York City base gave the publication greater influence than its editors could have initially imagined. Fusing intellectual life and activism, the magazine demonstrated anew the centrality of the black radical tradition to the larger left project in America.

Today, as the Black Lives Matter movement calls out the contradictions of American democracy and sparks debates about the direction of the country, Radical Intellect reminds us of the vital role that intellectuals and periodicals can play in that tradition.

READ MORE AT: https://jacobinmag.com/2017/12/radical-intellect-tinson-review-liberator-magazine

“Proof of Consciousness” (P.O.C.) the Host of REVIVE!!! 12/10/2017

Today’s REVIVE show topic is entitled:

“Sunday Edition” 

#TrendingTopics #CurrentEvents

#WhatsBuzzing

#REVIVERadio 

It would be amazing to hear your perspective. So please call in we want to hear what you guys out there have to say always. Once again this show is for the people. We here at REVIVE thrive off of communication. Don’t miss “What’s Buzzing” hosted by TLS Politics. So call us at (215)490-9832. This episode of REVIVE will be an open forum so all perspectives can be heard through great conversation.

This episode on REVIVE is entitled “Sunday Edition!” This is a jam-packed show with amazing guests and dynamic conversation! Join in the fun and spread the word! 

GUEST:

Kaliek Hayes: Kaliek Hayes  is the cofounder of Childhoodslost Entertainment Group (CHL) and Childhoodslost Foundation. A native of South Philadelphia, Kaliek grew up the middle child of five children. Like many children whose childhood experiences are significantly impacted and negatively influenced by plights resulting from broken homes, and disadvantaged environments, so was Kaliek’s. As a child, the tragic loss of a close friend, affected Kaliek’s life in profound ways, but eventually inspired the concept of Childhoodslost. Kaliek considers himself to be a simple man, but five years in the making, Kaliek’s vision has transformed Childhoodslost into something extraordinary. Childhoodslost affords youth the opportunities, to deal with issues affecting their childhoods in creative ways that strengthen their will to live in their purpose.

Kaliek is the author of Childhoodslost the book, which inspired Childhoodslost the play. Kaliek is currently Co authoring a book focusing on the effects of childhood trauma.

Kaliek believes that his success is contingent upon his hard work ethic and passion to live in his purpose, which is to strengthen Childhoodslost Foundation to be the voice for particularly, the youth who have suffered the pains and hardships of a childhood lost.

YOU CAN CATCH REVIVE EVERY SUNDAY 11 AM-1 PM & EVERY WEDNESDAY 8 PM-10 PM!!!  

It would be amazing to hear your perspective. So please call in we want to hear what you guys the listening audience out there have to say always. Once again this show is for the people. We here at REVIVE thrive off of communication. So call us at (215)490-9832 & follow on Twitter, Facebook & IG @REVIVE_POC !

 WE NEED YOU ALL TO BE APART OF THE CONVERSATION!!

“Time for an Awakening” with Bro. Elliott 12/10/17 Sunday Edition Open Forum and guest Kamm Howard

“Time for an Awakening” for Sunday 12/10/2017 at 7:00 PM (EST) 6:00 PM (CST) guests will be YOU in Open Forum conversation with the listeners on this weeks hot topics, or whatever is on your mind. But first, stopping by for an update on the heels of the resignation of Congressman John Conyers will be Activist, Organizer, Legislative Commission Chair of NCOBRA, Kamm Howard.  In 2017, from the need to develop a new mindset in our communities, to our political and economic empowerment, the solution to these problems must come from us. Let’s also talk about some solutions. You can join us and be part of the conversation on this and other related topics. Information, insights and dialogue from a Black Perspective.

UN poverty official touring Alabama’s Black Belt: ‘I haven’t seen this’ in the First World

Aaron Thigpen, a Fort Deposit activist, shows UN Special Rapporteur Philip Alston (left) a place in Lowndes County where two homes discharge raw sewage into an open-air pool via exposed PVC pipes. One home's water line runs right through the fetid area. (Connor Sheets | csheets@al.com)
Aaron Thigpen, a Fort Deposit activist, shows UN Special Rapporteur Philip Alston (left) a place in Lowndes County where two homes discharge raw sewage into an open-air pool via exposed PVC pipes. One home’s water line runs right through the fetid area. (Connor Sheets | csheets@al.com)

A United Nations official who tours the globe investigating extreme poverty said Thursday that areas of Alabama’s Black Belt are suffering the most dire sewage disposal crisis of any place he has visited in a developed country.

“I think it’s very uncommon in the First World. This is not a sight that one normally sees. I’d have to say that I haven’t seen this,” Philip Alston, the UN’s Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, said as he toured a Butler County community where raw sewage flows from homes through exposed PVC pipes and into open trenches and pits.

Alston was in Alabama on Thursday to bear personal witness to the poverty, lack of access to basic services and civil rights struggles that have plagued poor, mostly African-American residents of the state’s Black Belt region for generations.

Named for its rich soil and located in the southern half of the state, Alabama’s Black Belt is part of a ribbon of counties that stretches across the South and has a long history of poverty and racial discrimination.

The visit is part of a 15-day tour of the U.S. that Alston and his team are conducting to gather information for a report on poverty and human rights abuses in America that they expect to release in spring. The UN contingent, which has already visited cities in California, is also hosting a full day of meetings with civil society organizations today in Montgomery, after which it will travel to Atlanta, Puerto Rico, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia.

Alston told a Butler County man whose home has unreliable electricity service and whose septic tank has failed: “The hope is that we’ll bring attention to [these problems], just like we bring attention to people who are being tortured.”

Philip Alston, the UN’s Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, visited Alabama’s Black Belt on Thursday. (Connor Sheets | csheets@al.com)

‘Everyone gets sick’

On Thursday, Alston visited communities in the Black Belt’s Butler and Lowndes counties, where residents often fall ill with ailments like E. Coli and hookworm – a disease of extreme poverty long eradicated in most parts of the U.S. – in part because they do not have consistently reliable access to clean drinking water that has not been tainted by raw sewage and other contaminants.

Aaron Thigpen, an activist who has lived in Fort Deposit for all of his 29 years, showed Alston around a Lowndes County property where five members of his extended family, including two minor children and an 18-year-old with Down syndrome, live in a modest home.

Their house, like those of many of their neighbors, discharges its raw sewage via long, aging “straight pipes” that release the effluent aboveground, where it sits in fetid open-air pools.

Their sewage runs into sparsely wooded areas or across grassy fields when it rains, spreading the waste and the pathogens it contains, generating toxic conditions, repulsive visuals and an overwhelming stench.

“These two pipes are the raw sewage pipes coming from the house. And you’ve got your main water line here, and it may have a hole in it, so everyone gets sick all at once,” Thigpen said, pointing to exposed pipes running over a dank swamp of raw sewage.

“It’s really bad when you’ve got a lot of kids around like there are here. They’re playing ball and the ball goes into the raw sewage, and they don’t know the importance of not handling sewage,” he explained earlier in Butler County, where he showed Alston a rudimentary, manmade system of open-air ditches that carry effluent from homes to a nearby creek.

Open-air trenches carry raw sewage away from homes in a Butler County community Philip Alston, the UN’s Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, visited on Thursday. (Connor Sheets | csheets@al.com)

‘A human right’

Speaking with a Butler County resident whose failing septic tank releases raw sewage that bubbles up into his backyard, Alston said that the unwillingness of state and local governments to help people with no access to basic services like sewage management represents a dereliction of duty.

“There is a human right for people to live decently, and that means the government has an obligation to provide people with the essentials of life, which include power, water and sewage service,” Alston said. “But if the government says, ‘oh no, we’re not going to do it,’ and leaves you to install very expensive septic tanks, that’s not how it should work.”

The situation is particularly acute in Black Belt counties like Lowndes, where the annual median household income was just $30,225 and 25.4 percent of residents lived below the poverty line as of the 2010 U.S. Census. According to a UN report published in 2011, the “Alabama Department of Public Health estimates that the number of households in Lowndes County with inadequate or no septic systems range from 40 to 90 per cent; it has reported that 50 per cent of the conventional, on-site septic systems are currently failing or are expected to fail in the future.”

Rather than receiving any kind of government assistance to help them get their homes hooked up to municipal sewer lines or fix their septic systems or install new ones – which often cost between $10,000 and $30,000 each in the Black Belt – the residents are held entirely responsible for such work. But good-paying jobs are hard to come by in the economically distressed region, and many people survive on meager fixed government incomes.

“When you’re living off a fixed income of maybe $700 a month, there’s no way for you to be able to fix the problem,” Thigpen said.

A Butler County woman, who said she lives off a $400 monthly Social Security check and has dealt with sewage treatment problems for more than four decades, does not believe she will ever be able to afford to fix her failed septic tank, which releases sewage into the ground behind her mobile home.

“[Government officials] don’t think about this area. You have to put your own septic tank in, and when it rains you see what it do; it come back up,” she said as a light drizzle began to fall Thursday afternoon.

Raw sewage sits in an open-air pool outside a mobile home in a Butler County community where few residents have access to adequate sewage management services. (Connor Sheets | csheets@al.com)

‘People are frustrated’

Alston spent most of his time in the Black Belt speaking with low-income residents about insufficient access to sewage treatment and other basic services. But he also spoke with folks about voting rights and political representation.

Catherine Flowers, the director of the Alabama Center for Rural Enterprise and rural development manager at the Equal Justice Initiative, coordinated the site visits for the Black Belt leg of Alston’s U.S. tour.

“People think voting rights is just about access to the right to vote. But it’s also about once people get access to the vote, getting access to the privileges of citizenship, and also the right to have access,” Flowers said. “People are frustrated because people are getting into office who aren’t doing what the people elected them to do.”

Alston’s last stop Thursday afternoon was at the Fort Deposit home of Pattie Mae Ansley McDonald, a 96-year-old woman who said her house was “shot up” by racist white residents after she voted in 1965 shortly after the federal Voting Rights Act became law.

“We had never voted so they told me I would be sorry if I voted. The white folks told me to move out of Lowndes County, and I said, ‘I ain’t going nowhere,'” McDonald said.

She and two of her daughters spoke privately with Alston about their concerns about voting rights and access to the political process in Lowndes County. Mary McDonald, one of Pattie Mae Ansley McDonald’s 10 children, offered a brief summary of the discussion.

Fort Deposit resident Mary McDonald spoke with Philip Alston, the UN’s Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, on Thursday. (Connor Sheets | csheets@al.com)

“He was asking me about voter ID and whether people have a problem getting to the polls. I said not that I know of in this area, maybe in some other areas of the county,” she said. “But a lot of people aren’t being represented even though they’re voting.”

The whirlwind Thursday visit was an opportunity for the UN to learn more about the many problems that some of the poorest Americans struggle with on a daily basis, Alston said.

Asked why the UN is poking around in Alabama affairs, he explained that the UN’s remove from local issues is part of what makes trips like this one so beneficial.

“I’m Australian. You don’t send an American or someone from the South, you send someone who’s of another nationality,” he said. “I do a report back to the UN, but the U.S. government is following it all the time and they will have to respond.”

A borderless Africa? Some countries open doors, raise hopes

 

Rodney Muhumza  Dec 8, 2017

 

 

KAMPALA, Uganda — For years African leaders have toyed with the idea of free movement by citizens across the continent, even raising the possibility of a single African passport.

Now some African countries are taking bold steps to encourage borderless travel that could spur trade and economic growth on a continent in desperate need of both.

Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta announced during his inauguration last week that the East African commercial hub will now give visas on arrival to all Africans. That follows similar measures by nations including Benin and Rwanda.

“The freer we are to travel and live with one another, the more integrated and appreciative of our diversity we will become,” Kenyatta said.

The African Union has cheered such steps, calling it the direction the 54-nation continent needs to take. “I urge all African states that have not yet done so to take similar measures,” AU Commission chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat said on Twitter after Kenya’s announcement.

Trade among African countries is at just 16 percent, while trade among European Union states is at 70 percent, Mahamat told AU trade ministers.

For a continent whose leaders often speak fondly of “African brotherhood” and once pondered the idea of a United States of Africa, the visa policies of many countries for many years suggested little progress in implementing the continent-wide, visa-free ideal advocated by the AU.

Africans can get a visa on arrival in 24 percent of African countries, yet North Americans, for example, have easier access on the continent, according to a 2017 report on visa openness by the African Development Bank. African Union figures show Africans need visas to travel to 54 percent of the continent.

Free migration of people across the continent would help in talent exchange as well as trade, said Ali Abdi, the Uganda chief of mission at the International Organization for Migration. Countries may have to invest more in border patrols but “the benefits far outweigh the costs, in my view.”

Kenya’s decision is a “good move and it’s progressive,” said Godber Tumushabe with the Uganda-based Lakes Institute for Strategic Studies. “It should have been done a long time ago.”

Change is coming, and not just in East Africa. While visiting Rwanda last year, Benin’s President Patrice Talon said his West African country would no longer require visas for other Africans. He said he was inspired by Rwanda, whose government started issuing visas on arrival to Africans in 2013 and recently announced that in 2018 citizens of all countries will benefit from the policy.

“We are happy that other African countries are opening their borders up for Africans to increase foreign investments,” said Olivier Nduhungirehe, a deputy foreign minister in Rwanda in charge of regional integration. Opening borders will spur economic prosperity for the entire continent, he said.

Some African countries are going visa-free by region first. Weeks ago, the Central African Economic and Monetary Community removed visa requirements for citizens of its six members.

Many African countries rely heavily on tourism for foreign currency. Kenya’s new visa policy was welcomed in a country where the threat by Islamic extremists based in neighboring Somalia has deterred some international travelers.

Offering visas on arrival to all Africans could attract the continent’s small but growing middle class.

“Visa-free travel for Africans into Kenya is a great move by the president and a strategic one for the tourism industry,” said Bobby Kamani, who runs the popular Diani Reef Beach Resort and Spa in the second-largest city, Mombasa. “The president’s bold move couldn’t have come at a better time when the tourism sector has experienced uncertainty and is now on recovery mode.”

Conflict and sharp income disparities in many countries are among other factors slowing the adoption of visa-free policies. Even the African Union passport, launched in July 2016 and given to some heads of state, is yet to be offered to citizens.

Some North African countries, notably Libya, struggle with a flow of impoverished African migrants trying to make their way to Europe. South Africa, one of the continent’s top economies, has seen a sometimes violent backlash against African immigrants amid fears about crime and the taking of jobs. Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country and another of its strongest economies, maintains visa requirements before arrival for many nations across the continent.

Still, many are hopeful for a borderless Africa and urge those regional leaders to follow Kenya’s lead.

“Is a new wind blowing across #Africa?” Wolfgang Thome, a tourism consultant who once led the Uganda Tourism Association, tweeted. “When will the last walls fall? #Nigeria we are waiting!”

 

How African American Business Owners Can Protect Their Assets

The United States is a litigious nation; well over 15 million to 20 million civil cases are filed in the U.S. every year. There are nearly 3 million African American-owned businesses. Small businesses and their owners are prime targets for frivolous lawsuits. As a result, learning about your options for protecting your assets is crucial.

 

Prominent asset protection attorney Jay Adkisson is the author of Asset Protection: Concepts and Strategies for Protecting Your Wealth. Here are some strategies outlined by Adkisson and other experts for asset protection:

 

Equity Stripping

 

Equity stripping is the usage of liens to decrease the asset’s equity value. The mentality behind this strategy is that it will be difficult for a creditor in a civil judgment to make a claim against an asset that on “paper” has little equity value due to the lien(s) that are already pledging it.

 

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) & Federal Bankruptcy Laws

 

State exemption laws exempt certain asset classes from civil judgment execution and bankruptcy settlements. While the asset classes and their coverages vary by state, typical asset classes include real estate, retirement plans, life insurance proceeds, pensions, annuities, public benefits, tools of trade, wages, personal/miscellaneous property, and more.

 

Insurance Coverages

 

Basic personal and commercial insurance policies are essential for asset protection methods; these include having adequate coverages over your vehicles, home, along with personal liability coverage in terms of personal insurance policies. For commercial policies, the general liability, professional liability, workman’s compensation, product liability, and cyber law liability are coverages that would be applicable. Personal and commercial umbrella policies can also be acquired for coverages beyond the general policy amounts.

 

Business Entities

 

Choosing to not operate your business as a Sole Proprietorship and to incorporate the business, can separate your personal affairs from business affairs, creating a limited or separation of liability scenario. Said business entities include S-Corporations, C-Corporations, and Limited Liability Companies.

 

Trusts

 

The use of domestic trusts has been utilized by asset protection attorneys and consultants where the creator of the trust would also serve as the beneficiary.

 

Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (UFTA)

 

As a general rule, all asset protection strategies should be in place prior to the start of a civil lawsuit, to avoid potential violations of The Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (UFTA). UFTA monitors actions by debtors to make sure that there are no actual intentions to hinder, delay, or defraud a creditor.

 

Unscrupulous Asset Protection Consultants

 

There are a number of unscrupulous asset protection consultants who promote strategies that end up causing problems with tax authorities, court officials, and other regulators. Adkisson warns that research of any strategy should be conducted and asset protection planners, consultants, and representatives should be properly experienced in the area in which they are practicing.

READ MORE AT: http://www.blackenterprise.com/asset-protection-methods/

“Time for an Awakening” with Bro. Elliott 12/08/17 Open Forum Friday

“Time for an Awakening” for Friday  12/08/2017 at 8:00 PM (EST) 7:00 PM (CST), Open Forum Friday with the listeners, but first special guest will be Activist, Ife Fatiu to talk about the upcoming 4th Annual Women’s Conference in Baltimore. In 2017, from the need to develop a new mindset in our communities, to our political and economic empowerment, the solution to these problems must come from us. Let’s also talk about some solutions. You can join us and be part of the conversation on this and other related topics. Information, insights and dialogue from a Black Perspective.

 


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“Proof of Consciousness” (P.O.C.) the Host of REVIVE!!! 12/06/2017

Today’s REVIVE show topic is entitled:

“Wednesday Edition” 

#TrendingTopics #CurrentEvents

#REVIVERadio 

It would be amazing to hear your perspective. So please call in we want to hear what you guys out there have to say always. Once again this show is for the people. We here at REVIVE thrive off of communication. So call us at (215)490-9832. This episode of REVIVE will be an open forum so all perspectives can be heard through great conversation.

This episode on REVIVE is entitled “Wednesday Edition!” This is a jam-packed show with amazing guests and dynamic conversation! Join in the fun and spread the word! 

GUEST:

Porschia Percell: Porschia Percell founder and creator of  Cultures of  Can’douR .  A South Carolina native, Porschia has always had a deep appreciation and love for not only fashion, but all things creative. At an early age, she was introduced to fashion by her mother who studied Fashion Merchandising in college.  “I can remember as a kid plundering through my mom’s closet trying on all her vintage shoes and clothing.” Her love for fashion grew deeper at the age of 12 when she picked up her first sketch pencil and began designing. “I remember that day like it was yesterday.” “Cultures of Can’douR is much bigger than me and my ability to create. It’s about creating a culture of individuals who openly express themselves and feel confident about it. It’s about getting people to see that different is DOPE and COURAGEOUS.  I think loving yourself is the best form of bravery that one could ever have. Through fashion, visual film, and other creative outlets, I’m going to change the way individuals see themselves and I won’t stop until it’s finished.” That’s where Cultures of Can’douR  was born.

Kaliek Hayes: Kaliek Hayes is the cofounder of Childhoodslost Entertainment Group (CHL) and Childhoodslost Foundation. A native of South Philadelphia, Kaliek grew up the middle child of five children. Like many children whose childhood experiences are significantly impacted and negatively influenced by plights resulting from broken homes, and disadvantaged environments, so was Kaliek’s. As a child, the tragic loss of a close friend, affected Kaliek’s life in profound ways, but eventually inspired the concept of Childhoodslost. Kaliek considers himself to be a simple man, but five years in the making, Kaliek’s vision has transformed Childhoodslost into something extraordinary. Childhoodslost affords youth the opportunities, to deal with issues affecting their childhoods in creative ways that strengthen their will to live in their purpose. Kaliek is the author of Childhoodslost the book, which inspired Childhoodslost the play. Kaliek is currently Co authoring a book focusing on the effects of childhood trauma. Kaliek believes that his success is contingent upon his hard work ethic and passion to live in his purpose, which is to strengthen Childhoodslost Foundation to be the voice for particularly, the youth who have suffered the pains and hardships of a childhood lost.

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