health

The Secret to Keeping Black Men Healthy? Maybe Black Doctors

In an intriguing study, black patients were far more likely to agree to certain health tests if they discussed them with a black male doctor.

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Dr. ChaRandle Jordan was one of the doctors who participated in the study. “It’s something they don’t teach you in medical school — taking that extra step because you appreciate there have been barriers in the past,” he said. 

Black men have the lowest life expectancy of any ethnic group in the United States. Much of the gap is explained by greater rates of chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease, which afflict poor and poorly educated black men in particular.

But why is that? Lack of insurance? Lack of access to health care?

Now, a group of researchers in California has demonstrated that another powerful force may be at work: a lack of black physicians.

In the study, black men seeing black male doctors were much more likely to agree to certain preventive measures than were black men seeing doctors who were white or Asian.

Although 13 percent of the population is black in the United States, just 4 percent of doctors are black.

The study, published in June by the National Bureau for Economic Research, involved 702 black men in Oakland, Calif., who came to a clinic for a free health screening. They were randomly assigned to a black male doctor or one who was white or Asian.

Neither the men nor the doctors knew that the purpose of the study was to ask if a doctor’s race mattered when he or she advised these patients. As it turned out, the racial effects were not subtle.

Diabetes screening was part of the health check, and 63 percent of the black men assigned to a black doctor agreed to the screening. But just 43 percent of those assigned to a doctor who was white or Asian consented to be screened.

Some 62 percent of black men with a black doctor agreed to cholesterol tests, compared to 36 percent assigned to a doctor who was not black.

“If their first reaction is, ‘No, I’m not interested in that,’ you must explore why they said no and address those concerns.”

Dr. ChaRandle Jordan


Previous studies have been observational — mostly searching earlier data for trends, a substantially weaker form of evidence — and their results mixed.

“It changed the way I think,” said Jonathan Skinner, a health care economist at Dartmouth College, about the new results. “This study convinced me that the effects are real.”

The researchers employed minority premedical students to recruit participants by visiting 20 barbershops and two flea markets in Oakland, offering black men vouchers for a free health screening.

The screening was at a clinic set up by the investigators and staffed by 14 black and nonblack doctors. The men were offered preventive measures like flu shots and screenings for blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes.

The men who came to the clinic offered equal praise for their black, white and Asian doctors. But the patients were far more likely to consent to preventive care — screenings and vaccinations — when their doctor was also black.

If black patients were to agree to this preventive care at these rates in the real world, the gap in cardiovascular mortality between black men and the rest of the population could be reduced by 20 percent, the researchers estimated.

“I don’t think I have ever had such a strong result, so unambiguous,” said Dr. Marcella Alsan, an associate professor of medicine at Stanford University and an author of the study.

Why would black doctors have such an effect? Perhaps they used more nonverbal cues to communicate empathy, said Dr. Amber E. Barnato, a professor of medicine and health care delivery at Dartmouth College.

In another small study, she used black and white actors to study white doctors’ interactions with patients at the end of life. Although the doctors said similar things to both black and white actors posing as patients, they stood closer to the white patients, made more eye contact, and touched them more often.

In the new study, Dr. Alsan and her colleagues did not record patient visits. But some hints of the differences could be seen in comments the patients and doctors wrote in evaluations of their experiences.

The white and Asian doctors often wrote comments like “weight loss,” “tb test” and “anxiety” — cryptic notations that referred to medical recommendations.

The black doctors often left more personal notes, like “needs food, shelter, clothing, job, ‘flu shot makes you sick,’ he got one.” And “subject yelled at me but then agreed to get flu shot because I recommended it.” And “made patient laugh.”

Black men who saw white doctors wrote comments like, “It was a great and fast experience, doctor was great as well.” And “very informative, very appreciated.”

Those who saw black doctors wrote comments like, “The entire day made me feel very comfortable and relaxed” and “cool doctor” — comments that described an emotional response.

Bridging this racial divide is a fraught matter, noted Dr. Skinner.

“It doesn’t seem so controversial if a woman requests a woman physician,” he said. “If a black patient asks for a black doctor, it’s understandable, especially given this study. But what if a white patient asks for a white doctor?”

A white doctor in this study, who asked that his name be withheld because he has black patients, said he felt his interactions with those who came to the clinic were “normal, comfortable health care visits.” Still, he was not surprised to hear the study’s results.

“Anyone going to see a doctor will be nervous,” he said. “If you face discrimination regularly in life, you will go into a clinic with even more apprehensions. If you see a physician who is African-American, you will feel some relief.”

One of the black doctors who participated in the study, Dr. ChaRandle Jordan, noted that low-income black patients in Oakland tend to be guarded in the doctor’s office.

“When you go into the room, you have to ask them about themselves, establish a rapport with them,” he said. “If their first reaction is, ‘No, I’m not interested in that,’ you must explore why they said no and address those concerns.”

“They might say, ‘Each time my mother had it, she would get the flu,’” he said of patients considering flu shots. “You say, ‘How about you try it this time? I bet you won’t get the flu or it will be less severe.’ You are joking a little bit.”

“It’s something they don’t teach you in medical school — taking that extra step because you appreciate there have been barriers in the past,” Dr. Jordan added.

White doctors can reach out just as well, Dr. Jordan said, adding that a lot depends on how familiar a doctor is with black patients.

Could white doctors have more success with black patients if they carefully watched what black doctors do? “Maybe, maybe not,” said David Cutler, a professor of applied economics at Harvard University.

But now that the researchers showed that a doctor’s race can really matter to his or her patients, he said, the medical profession should take heed.

“The magnitude of the effect is so huge, how can you ignore it?” Dr. Cutler asked.

READ MORE AT: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/20/health/black-men-doctors.html

Study shows hair care products targeted to black community contain harmful chemicals

Certain hair products — many of which are used on black girls from birth to help straighten their hair — have been linked to such health issues such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and breast cancer.

Certain hair products — many of which are used on black girls from birth to help straighten their hair — have been linked to such health issues such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and breast cancer.

 

Hair products that for years have been targeted at the African American community may be causing health problems for its customers.

Researchers at the Silent Spring Institute, working with epidemiologist Tamarra James-Todd at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, measured the concentrations of chemicals in 18 of these products. What they found was that each product contained four to 30 types of chemicals.

Many of the products contained fragrances with phthalates, which have been linked to obesity and increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, pre-term birth, preeclampsia and gestational diabetes, says James-Todd.

James-Todd says that after Native Americans, black women have the highest prevalence of diabetes in the US. She says they also have the highest proportion of pre-term births and are more likely to be overweight or obese.

“When you’re thinking about a lot of these metabolic or reproductive health outcomes, it’s really important to consider why that might be occurring and not simply attribute it to, ‘Oh, there must be some inherent underlying genetic differences,’” she says.

James-Todd, who is African American, says women in the black community have for decades felt social and cultural pressures “regarding what is seen as beautiful, with straight long hair being kind of the stamp of beauty,” especially in Western culture.

“And so, people will do different things to try to adhere to that standard of beauty,” she says.

What the majority of the public does not know, she says, is that currently there are no laws that require personal care product companies to disclose all of the substances that are going into their products, due to trademark agreements. There is movement in the US Senate to enact the Personal Care Product and Safety Act, which would develop a protocol by which products are tested before being placed on store shelves.

“We’re completely relying on the companies to test for the safety of our products,” James-Todd says. “That seems like a conflict of interest. The company is trying to make a profit … [even though] the average consumer thinks that if it’s on the shelf, it’s safe.”

Seeing the connections

James-Todd became interested in the topic of what chemicals go into hair products while a master’s student at Boston University. She read about a study that compared a magazine advertisement for an anti-aging cream in Ladies’ Home Journal, a publication targeting white women, versus an ad for a placenta-based product  — sheep placenta has become a mainstay ingredient in lots of leave-in conditioners — in Essence magazine, which targets black women.

“I’d walk into a black hair supply or hair care store, and see placenta and just wonder, what exactly is that for? Why are people using that?” she says. “Around that same time, an issue of Time magazine had come out, querying why were girls starting their periods earlier and earlier. And somehow that just kind of clicked for me.”

Shortly thereafter, there was a large study done that reported that 60 percent of black girls had reached their period by age 12, compared to about half of that for white girls.

“As a master’s student, that piqued my interest,” James-Todd says.

When she was working on his doctoral degree at Columbia University, James-Todd led a study around hair products being used in the greater New York metro area. The results backed up her theory: More girls were using hair oils for a longer period of time and those girls were much more likely to have their period earlier, which can significantly increase the likelihood of breast cancer.

Another study that served as inspiration, James-Todd says, was one in which four African American girls, ranging from four months to four years of age, showed they had all been developing breast and pubic hair — all of whom had mothers who were using hair oils and different types of products on them. An independent laboratory test confirmed that there were three types of estrogen found within the collection of products being used.

James-Todd says it is now known that about 50 percent of the products marketed to black women contain these controversial chemicals, compared to only about seven percent of products targeted to white women.

When James-Todd was conducting the hair products study in New York, several men would approach her and ask if they could take part as well. At the time, she was focused on breast cancer relating to women.

“It was kind of an ‘aha’ moment and so the reality is that black men are using these products, too,” she says. “Oftentimes, they wear shorter hairstyles and so if you think about it, the application of some of these products is that much more close to the scalp and absorbed through the scalp, and could have some similar health implications for diseases that are linked to some of these endocrine-disrupting chemicals.”

James-Todd has let her own natural hair be as curly as it wants to be ever since she was a girl growing up in Tennessee and saw her hair fall out after having a perm. She remembers, though, being an undergraduate student at Vanderbilt University and getting judgmental looks from fellow black women for choosing to not straighten her hair. Many thought she was from a different country.

“If I was American, I would not wear my hair this way,” she says of their collective thoughts. “And it’s been beautiful to see people embracing their hair. I am fragrance-free. I’ve been using the same product now for the past 30-plus years. Thank goodness it’s still on the market.”

James-Todd also uses the same product on her young daughter. She is a proponent of minimizing the amount of hair products one uses.

“As far as advocating for other women, I understand that some people don’t feel as comfortable doing that, or they think that it’ll affect their job or other issues,” she says. “But I think as society changes its standards of beauty, it’s been nice to see that being embraced.”

READ MORE AT: https://www.pri.org/stories/2018-06-18/study-shows-hair-care-products-targeted-black-community-contain-harmful-chemicals

“Time for an Awakening” with Bro. Elliott in Open Forum 11/19/2017

“Time for an Awakening” for Sunday 11/19/2017 at 7:00 PM, Open Forum conversation with the listeners on this weeks hot topics. Our health segment guest was Universal African Peoples Organization Health Minister Nathaniel Jordan, with information on Type II Diabetes, and other valuable health tips.

Black Americans living longer, but racial gap remains, CDC says

 

Nurse Visiting Senior Male Patient At Home

When it comes to the overall health of black Americans, there’s good news and bad news, according to a report released by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday.

The good news is that the overall death rate for black people in the United States has declined about 25% in recent years.
The bad news is that, although blacks are living longer, a racial disparity remains: The life expectancy of blacks is still four years less than that of whites.
Younger blacks are more likely to live with or die from conditions typically found in older whites, such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes, according to the report.
The new report included health data and age-adjusted death rates for black and white Americans from 1999 to 2015. Additionally, age-specific data and death rates were examined. The data were analyzed for age-specific trends among four adult age groups: 18 to 34, 35 to 49, 50 to 64 and 65 and older.
The data came from the US Census Bureau, the National Vital Statistics System and the CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
The data showed that from 1999 to 2015, death rates decreased significantly in both black and white populations, and the racial disparity in death rates between the two populations fell from 33% in 1999 to 16% in 2015.

Common causes of death, by county

What are major causes of death in your county? New data show surprising trends and differences in county-level mortality rates across the United States. Click on your state and select your county to find leading causes of your death in your neighborhood, with mortality rates measured by the number of deaths per every 100,000 people.

‘Many of the disparities … are largely preventable’

Black Americans saw notable declines in age-specific deaths related to heart disease, cancer and HIV from 1999 to 2015, said Timothy Cunningham, an epidemiologist at the CDC Division of Population Health and lead author of the new report, at a telebriefing Tuesday.
“Death rates from HIV among blacks went down about 80% in 18- to 49-year-olds,” he said.
Dramatic decreases in HIV deaths were seen among whites too, the data showed. Yet a racial disparity remains, as blacks are still more likely to die from HIV, according to the report.
The data also showed that blacks in the 18 to 34 and 35 to 49 age groups were nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease, stroke and diabetes as whites.
For blacks 18 to 64, the data showed that they were at a higher risk of early death than whites.
“These findings are generally consistent with previous reports that use the term ‘weathering,’ which suggests that blacks experience premature aging and earlier health decline than whites and that this decline in health accumulates across the entire lifespan and potentially across generations. This happens as a consequence of psychosocial, economic and environmental stressors,” said Leandris Liburd, director of the CDC’s Office of Minority Health and Health Equity.
Liburd was not an author of the new report, which was published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
For adults 65 and older, the racial death rate gap appeared to close, the data showed. In general, the leading causes of deaths for blacks are heart disease, cancer and stroke, Liburd said.
“I can’t say enough that we need to continue to understand both the relationship between social and economic conditions and how they impact health disparities and then identify ways that we can work to improve those conditions,” she said. “African-American health is improving, and many of the disparities we see in the chronic diseases are largely preventable.”

‘Where we live determines our health’

The new report pointed to social and economic conditions, such as poverty, limited access to health care, educational attainment and home ownership, as factors influencing the racial health gaps that remain.
For instance, “disparities in premature deaths associated with heart disease, stroke and diabetes are due to our inability to provide adequate disease management for blacks who are diagnosed with hypertension and diabetes,” said Darrell Gaskin, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions and a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He was not involved in the new report.
“We see similar disparities in treatment for cancer patients,” he said.The new CDC report showed that blacks have the highest death rate for all cancers combined compared with whites.Also, in all age groups, blacks were more likely than whites to describe not being able to visit a doctor in the past year due to cost, according to the report.”The good news is that disparities in mortality rates are narrowing in the major categories. However, we have long ways to go,” Gaskin said about the report.The National Urban League, a civil rights group, released a separate report Tuesday titled “State of Black America 2017: Protect Our Progress.”The report notes that President Donald Trump’s efforts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act could disproportionately burden the black community, which already faces a disparity in access to care.
“It is like a massive wildfire that is burning the African-American community, and society has not devoted sufficient resources to control it, much less extinguish it,” he said.
Gaskin proposed that community resources — such as access to public safety, quality foods, public recreation and medical care — could help diminish such disparities.
While individual behaviors, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly, are important, investing in black communities and expanding access to care also remain important for improving overall health, said Cunningham, the report’s lead author.
“What we do know from other studies that have documented changes in mortality and changes in life expectancy over time is that they are often associated with improvements in health care access, such as screening for chronic conditions, regular followup visits, taking medication regularly,” Cunningham said at the news conference.
“Where we live determines our health; it determines our quality of housing, the schools we attend, our employment opportunities,” he said. “Individual behaviors are important, but one challenge we face is that we have to invest in the places where people live.”
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10 Herbs You Need To Use If Diagnosed With Cancer

Black mortar and pestle with fresh picked herbs

 

Did you know that half of all Americans will eventually be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives? In other words, it’s only a matter of chance whether you will or won`t be one of those people.

According to World Health Organisation (WHO), cancer takes 7.6 million lives every year, which makes it one of the leading causes of death. It is believed that deaths of cancer will continue to rise over 13.1 million by 2030.

For over 60 years that market has been tapped into Western medical treatment centers, which provide chemotherapy and radiation to help shrink cancer tumors. Like we’re told, cancer is random, it’s genetic, and sooner or later, it’s going to get us.

However, more and more studies suggest that accumulation of toxins in the body is the underlying cause of cancer, as it reduces cell oxygenation, damages the DNA, causes inflammation, and leads to hormone imbalance. Therefore, dealing with these toxins and diminishing their effect is the first step towards preventing its development.

Recently, multiple studies started focusing on the use of herbs for cancer prevention, even using them along with Western medical treatment.

The idea that simple plants or herbs can have anti-cancer effects is sometimes a controversial subject. Although many people have experienced their benefits, there are still a great many skeptics. For every person who believes that herbs and plants can slow or even kill cancer cells, there is another who will only believe in the merits of chemotherapy.

Here’s a list of best 10 herbs for preventing and treating cancer and how to use them:

1.Wheatgrass

Wheatgrass is considered a detoxifying medical herb. Health benefits include improving red blood cell count and neutralizes environmental pollutants within the body. Also, wheatgrass shows benefits in cancer prevention.

You can use wheatgrass by juicing it daily in 2oz shots. Using wheatgrass during chemotherapy has been beneficial and may reduce symptoms of myelotoxicity. Plus, wheatgrass helps to alkalize the body.

2.Grape seed extract

Several studies have shown that the phytochemicals known as proanthocyanidins in grape seeds have anti-tumor or strong potential cancer preventative abilities that can be isolated from the seeds themselves. Also, they have been found to stop cancer cells from spreading or migrating.

Grape seed extract fights pollution and Candida within our digestive tract. This extract can be found at your holistic vitamin shop and used according to directions.

3.Burdock root (Arctium lappa)

Recent research shows that burdock root is very effective at removing cancer-causing toxins that accumulate in our digestive systems when certain foods are not properly digested. There are several anti-cancer herbal compounds that have used burdock root as a base including “Essiac tea formula” and “Hoxsey formula”.

Because of its strong blood purifying properties, burdock root can stop cancer cells from metastasizing. Burdock root extract can be found at your holistic vitamin shop and used according to directions.

4.Licorice root

Licorice detoxifies the liver and is a soothing herb with anti-inflammatory properties. It may also be used for the treatment of Candida albicans. Licorice root contains polyphenols that encourage apoptosis (automatic death) in cancer cells. Licorice regulates the production of hormones from your adrenal glands, and it reduces stress chemicals. Chronic stress often triggers the growth of cancer cells. You can use it as a tea mixed with a teaspoon of organic raw honey.

5.Red clover

Research from a number of cancer centers including the Royal Marsden has shown its potential as a part of a treatment program against estrogen driven cancers, from breast, uterine, to the prostate. Red clover contains an active ingredient known as genistein, responsible for its anti-estrogen activity. Red clover is another ingredient in “Hoxsey formula”.

Red clover supplements are available in most health food stores as tablets, capsules or in a tincture. Dried red clover leaves are often brewed into a tea with a typical daily dose being about 4 grams of dried red clover to 30 milliliters of water.

6.Bloodroot

Externally, it has been used as a home remedy for skin cancer and is possibly the most well-known anti-cancer herb around. There have been several publications showing that bloodroot has the potential to be a powerful anticancer agent. Bloodroot (Sanguinaria Canadensis) has been shown in several studies to have consistent anti-neoplastic activity; it can shrink tumors and has shown itself to be useful when dealing with sarcomas.

For internal use, mix one teaspoon bloodroot in 250 ml warm water and let it stay for 15 minutes. Drink a half of the tea in the morning and the other half in the evening.

7.Dandelion

There has been strong evidence lately that dandelion root can inhibit the development and growth of numerous types of cancer, including stopping their metastasizing capabilities. A study done in 2008 provided some scientific proof that dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) extracts had anti-cancer compounds.

Dandelion root tea or capsules can be found at your holistic vitamin shop and used according to directions.

8.Mistletoe

The extracts from mistletoe (Viscum album) is one of the most commonly used oncological drug in Europe. It’s been used as an overall treatment for cancer for years. In one study that involved more than 10,000 cancer patients, mistletoe extract was shown to prolong the survival time of cancer patients. Amazingly, this study showed that the overall survival time of the group that took mistletoe extract was as much as 40% longer.

Mistletoe can be found at your holistic vitamin shop and used according to directions. Also, there are some products that come from mistletoe extract, especially Iscador, which is one of the most commonly used in Europe.

9.Echinacea

Echinacea is one of the most widely used alternative medicine in the world. It is said to have Cytotoxic effects. The Echinacea plant has been hailed for its ability to help the body heal itself from the common cold. Also, it is used to relieve anxiety and chronic fatigue. Echinacea has been available for years in supplements and extract form and can be used about 2 to 3 times a day. Echinacea can be also consumed as a tea.

10.Watercress

Watercress this aquatic plant increases detoxification enzymes in the body and contains phytonutrients that have successfully inhibited carcinogens. Watercress in extract form proved to be significantly protective against colon cancer. In a study at the Norwich Food Research Center in the United Kingdom, “smokers were given watercress which eliminated higher carcinogens in their urine. Dietary factors contribute to the regional variation of stomach cancer and offer clues for further prevention research. Watercress can be found at your holistic vitamin shop and used according to directions.

Note: In order to fight cancer, you can use a combination of the herbs mentioned above!

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Johnson & Johnson Reportedly Pushed Talcum Powder on Black Women After White Women Cease Use Due to Cancer Risk

 

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For most women, it’s a normal part of their hygienic routine to sprinkle a little baby powder on themselves or in their underwear. The self-care practice is a normal one, specifically for women in the African-American community.

A St. Louis woman named Jacqueline Fox did so for over 40 years, dusting the lining of her panties with talcum powder each morning. It wasn’t until 2013 that she was diagnosed with advanced stage ovarian cancer and learned that the baby powder she had been using for so long might be to blame, CNN.com reports. Fox lost her battle with the disease in October 2015.

Now, the New Jersey-based company Johnson & Johnson is embroiled in a number of lawsuits claiming their baby powder products, made with talcum powder, cause cancer. According to Rolling Out, about 20 recent medical studies have found a connection between the use of talcum powder and ovarian cancer.

The company lost its second lawsuit on May 2, 2016 for the death of another Black woman named Gloria Ristesund. In that case, the jury awarded $5 million in damages and $50 million in punitive damages, Rolling Out reports. Fox was the first plaintiff to be compensated for damages however, according to CNN.com. Following her death, a St. Louis jury ordered Johnson & Johnson to award her family $72 million.

The company plans to appeal the latest ruling.

“Unfortunately, the jury’s decision goes against 30 years of studies by medical experts around the world that continue to support the safety of cosmetic talc,” Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman Carol Goodrich said in a statement.

Thousands of other women have followed suit, suing the company for selling a product that would ultimately cause them to develop cancer. The Washington Post reports that Johnson & Johnson currently faces at least 1,200 pending talcum powder lawsuits, which includes around 1,000 in St. Louis and another 200 in New Jersey.

Goodrich disputes the claims and says that Johnson & Johnson has provided consumers with “a safe choice for cosmetic powder products” for the last 100 years.

Jim Onder, the attorney who represented Ristesund in her lawsuit, disagrees, however. Onder says that researchers first linked talcum powder and ovarian cancer in the 1970s and cites internal documents from Johnson & Johnson that show the company was familiar with those studies.

“The evidence is real clear that Johnson & Johnson has known about the dangers associated with talcum powder for over 30 years,” Onder said. “Instead of giving a warning, what they did was target the groups most at risk for developing ovarian cancer.”

On top of knowingly selling a carcinogenic product, the company is accused of marketing the powder to African-American women, encouraging them to purchase the product after use by their white counterparts dropped due to the risk of developing cancer.

In her article written for Time, Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley suggests that Johnson & Johnson, along with other cosmetic companies, are guilty of profiting from the “myths of the excessive black vagina.”

“They’re willing to capitalize on our internalized misogynoir even if we die in the process,” Tinsley wrote.

Her article also states that African-American women douche and deodorize their genitals twice as much as white women, according to research conducted by Francesca Branch, Tracey J. Woodruff, Susanna D. Mitro and Ami R. Zota. Many of those products also contain human carcinogen and are linked to other health risks not visibly listed on labels.

An Atlanta lawyer is now making efforts to stop the unfortunate trend of Black women dying from cancer caused by the use of baby powder. Mawuli Mel Davis and his firm, Davis-Bozeman, are spearheading the initiative to inform African-American women in Georgia about the risks of using talcum powder and the possible legal action they could take against companies like Johnson & Johnson, Rolling Out reports. Davis calls the company’s plan to target Black women a “Corporate Tuskegee Experiment.”

Davis also revealed that his firm has recently taken up the case of a 34-year-old Georgia woman who died from ovarian cancer in 2015. While his team investigates the case, Davis says he wants to continue making women aware of the dangers of talcum powder.

“We say, ‘Don’t Wait! Stop Now!,’ ” he said. “We are calling on sororities, women’s health organizations and all activists to take part in this health movement. We must get the word out: remove this product from your home!”

8 Disturbing Ways Society is Feminizing Men Through Food And Products

8 Disturbing Ways Society is Feminizing Men Through Food And Products – See more at: http://www.enlightened-consciousness.com/8-disturbing-ways-society-is-feminizing-men-through-food-and-products/#sthash.9A8R32yG.dpuf

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